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20121101
20121130
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WETA 26
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
aviv in day two of a growing middle east conflict. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the war which has claimed civilian deaths on both sides. >> brown: then, b.p. admits to felony charges and agrees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets w
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: large parts of new jersey were in ruins today, as it became clear the state bore the brunt of the storm from its coastline to the new york suburbs. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on rescue and recovery efforts in the northeast. plus, hari sreenivasan reports from lower manhattan where shuttered businesses are facing mounting losses. >> brown: then, after a pause from the storm. it was game back-on for the presidential candidates with five days to go before election day. we get an update. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> we need a president who understands business, and i do. that's why i will be able to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challengin
standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama was back at the white house today and congress returns to washington early next week. top on the agenda for both: a looming fiscal crisis. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we assess the task ahead in negotiations to avoid an economic hit from automatic spending cuts and tax increases. >> brown: then, we examine what's next for the republican party, after a second straight presidential campaign rebuke from a changing american electorate. >> woodruff: the associated press still hasn't called a winner in florida. why not? and why were the lines so long at some polling places across the country? ray suarez gets some answers. >> brown: john merrow tells the story of pediatricians with a new prescription: books to build better brains. >> there's solid research that shows that just that intervention of handing a family a book, giving them a couple of age-appropriate pieces of advice about how to read with their kid and just encouraging reading, they--
that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, spst giepma r oadtsinorchn sa' magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and citdwellers eat twice as much meat on average as those in the countryside. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the en
for mitt romney. >> ifill: we examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshoovidided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election o
. now we'll go to geoffrey brown for more on these and other congressional matters. >> brown: thanks, gwen. i'm with, here with political editor christina bell and tony and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothenberg political report. so if we start to look at the senate, they were talking about indiana called early for mitt romney on the presidential side. stu, that is not the case in this important senate race. >> we thought it might be when we first looked back months ago. >> brown: you mean months ago. richard murdoch ended up defeating richard lugar long-time senator dick lugar in a rather bitter nasty republican, an ideological race where murdoch attacked lugar for not only being too liberal on questions of guns and national security but also not having a e, not living in the state. murdoch seem to be the clear favorite to win the seat to hold on the seat for the republicans but stumble after stumble he looked sometimes unwilling to compromise, angry, bitter. and i think it worked on voters. then more recently we had a controversy on rape and abortion and whether it was a misst
called up reservists and massed tanks on the gaza border. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have an on-the-ground report from gaza city, followed by two views of the widening conflict on the third day of hostilities. >> woodruff: then, an update on the syrian war. margaret warner spent the day inside rebel-held territory. >> brown: we get a "battleground dispatch" from megan verlee of colorado public radio. voters in that state approved a ballot initiative allowing anyone over 21 to buy marijuana. >> politicses, businesspeople and law enforcement are wondering what comes next. har >> woodruff: hari sreenivasan talks to andrew kohut about the pew center's post-election report card, with the candidates, the campaigns, and the news media getting low marks. >> brown: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and how much did the presidential candidates spend on social media? ray suarez has some answers on the daily download. >> take a look at this, the obama campaign spent $47 million on digital sending
. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we'll have excerpts from the president's remarks, and our own debate on the economic challenges ahead with two senators, maryland democrat ben cardin and tennessee republican bob corker. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez has the latest on the surprise resignation of cia chief david petraeus after admitting to an extra-marital affair. >> brown: it's still cold and dark in many new jersey homes. special correspondent rick karr follows utility crews as they work to turn the electricity back on. >> access to these lines is quite difficult, cutting through peoples' backyards. you may come in one and cross four other yards just to get to your job site. >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: intel >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own. with united healthcare, i got help that treat my li
. the architect of the law that says if you are white, you are all right. if you are brown, show me your papers. that resonated throughout the country. back in february, with that endorsement. it was great for the republican primary. damaging in the general election. for the general election -- say goodbye to hispanics. there was a reaction from hispanics. and even marco rubio cannot correct the problem. they have a deeper problem. they have to deal with the george wallaces of the republican party. that is what jan bring or is to latinos. >> charles? >> and the demographics, the idea of republicans being white, i think, is wrong. it is true they have problems with african-americans, single women, and young people. those tend to be liberal. with hispanics that are naturally more conservative, religious, a catholic, it requires a change in policy on immigration. it can be done in one stroke. once it is done, we will not be speaking about the demographic issue. we will be talking about ideological issues. >> all right. let's talk about the new congress. >> i would not have been able to do this wit
: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage andllt measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. w major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.
, two years from now we will have another midterm election. >> brown: if you think about four years ago, there was no tea party. two years later, that's what we're hearing about. here we are two years later. and the question that i think we're all sort of groping at here is how much does it-- is it a national movement or how much was it limited? >> don't forget how much of this is determined by republican primaries. and this actually goes to the size of the electorate. in a lot of cases, richard mourdocks victory could be looking at as they have this internal party struggle-- ted cuz was elected tonight and will be coming to the senate. that could push the entire direction of the republican party in a different way, and that's what the tea party is looking at. they say the they're still aliv. they're sending out messages of that tonight. >> brown: social media? >> regular meade what, saying we're still alive and well. >> woodruff: to overlay what you all have been talking about, the a.p. is reminding us that the democrats now will maintain their majority in the senate, and i'm just-- yo
. >> kaine. >> kaine. that is 8 for kaine. >> massachusetts -- elizabeth warren r. scott brown? >> warren. >> i think warren. >> sharon brown and lh. >> casey in pennsylvania. >> kerrey in nebraska, which nobody would have predicted -- >> kerrey the democrat. medal of honor winner. >> he has the endorsement of chuck hagel and alan simpson, both serious republican leaders in their day in the senate. >> it is close in the poll. chris murphy wins in connecticut. linda mcmahon's second race, millions of dollars. joe donnelly in indiana and not against mourdock. -- hanging on against mourdock. jon tester in montana absolute dead heat. heidekamp in north dakota, r an a tour of the campaign, even with the republican -- think.ill is close, i >> do you see much ticket splitting? a vote for obama or romney and then vote for republican or democrat for the senate? >> i think we are a more polarized nation. >> ticket splitting would be good because there is an interesting theory that it would be helpful to romney if the democrats kept control of the senate by a vote or two because it would allow romne
nickel for sherrod brown. >> i don't want a free dinner for barack obama. (laughter) >> woodruff: that looks like a full house but it looks like a quiet full house. >> ifill: can i hop back over to stu and christina because there are a couple of house races just now being called. in ohio, are you guys seeing this? >> yeah, we've been tracking them all night and we can definitely talk about them. one thing we wanted to chat about just -- for a second because we covered this on the newshour is in new hampshire actually women made history here. you had maggie hassan was elected governor, first female governor from that state. carol shea porter won that seat and ann mcchain custer won that seat so they have an all female delegation and, of course, the r vnoeras well. so this is a prettynonteresting situation where they're making history. and this was a good night for women overall you had a woman winning in hawaii. tammy baldwin winning in wisconsin. liz wet warren winning in massachusetts. and on the republican side you have deb fish erwining the seat in nebraska. these are four new
they can to get out. roads and recreation grounds are submerged in brown, soupy water. and in some warts of this region the only way to get around is by boat. elsewhere, it is just not safe at all. the area affected is just north of rome. here it has been raining for days. the bad weather has swept across italy. in venice, seasonal flooding was higher and more widespread than normal. and unless you were in a gondola, there was little way to stay dry. there the floods are receding. but it is now the waterlogged tuscana and brea tna that are baring the brunt. "bbc news." >> right now china's ruling communicatist party is meeting in beijing to anoint its new leaders. among the most pressing issues they will face, a territorial dispute with japan that has erupted into the worst crisis interest the two nations in decades. at issue is a group of islands. our correspondent has gone to take a closer look and to see what is fueling all this controversy. >> just after dawn we get our first view of the islands. a jagged huddle of rocks sticking up from the deep blue waters of the east china sea. i
, many want to be just like her. dr. gordon brown is hearing about the ambitions people have, many girls never see the inside of the classroom. she risked her life to campaign for girls' education and the united nations is going to carry on that fight. she pledged to campaign for them just before she was shot. >> simply for going to school, wanting to go to school, it is so unspeakable. >> they raise their voices in her honor, a nobel peace prize. the courageous teenager would be a worthy recipient. for more of the global attention her case has drawn, i spoke to the founder of women for women international that joined us from new york. the effect taking place in pakistan, is it possible something positive could come out of her plight? >> i would hope so. she is a representation of the plight of many girls. not only pakistan, but all over the world. a girl is very articulate, clear about what she wants, and within the frame of her culture and religion, is still targeted for assassination for speaking up and wanting to go to school. it triggered something that the terrorists pushed their l
sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: israel stepped up its military offensive in gaza today and hamas rockets targeted tel
of brown rice, you are eating these enormous amount of calories, is still fat. in my heart,log .'d be dead n tavis: how much of wanting to be in a project like this, i don't care if your name is sally field, hwhoever else, is there a gravitational pull to even want to be in a project like this when you know, even before it is done, you do not know if it is going to work, but if you know if it does work, it is going to be huge. when steven spielberg is taking on lincoln and daniel day-lewis is going to be lincoln. there are all kinds of signs around a project like this, this is going to beat massive. it is not about winning the academy award. if you are an actor, this is the kind of stuff that you want in your career to be a part of. is there any truth to that? >> there is a truth to it but it is not quite the same as you said. it is to me to have the opportunity and the privilege to do that kind of work with that kind of excellence around you, that it be the screenplay, standing across from the brilliant daniel day-lewis, or tommy lee jones or the cast was not to be believed. or that you w
that their black and brown people in america, young people, jews and asians, and somehow they have all but given the vote. how did this happen? well, they were bribed, given gifts instead of corporations and banks getting gifts. >> and they are all special interest groups, not really part of the whole. these strange interest groups, like young people getting some relief -- >> but you have responsible republicans saying that we have got to reach out more to hispanics -- >> senator marco rubio said yesterday, "i don't know these people who don't want to work." these governors, republican governors, if you are in a gerrymandered house district, you can keep with the 47%. if you are a senator like marco rubio or somebody with presidential aspirations, you cannot keep saying this about people. >> it will take more than cosmetics or 4 wolfe street it is policy. that is what they have to come to grips -- it will take more than cosmetics or photo ops. it is policy. that is what they have to come to grips with it. their policies don't wash with people, the people in need to reach. >> it worked in 2010. i
is not to engage in political campaigning. >> ryssdal: jim brown is wtp's outside counsel. >> they're an issue advocacy group and they're allowed to engage in lobbying and, as such, they don't need to register their activities with the state of montana. >> ryssdal: but as unsworth dug deeper, he began to suspect that the different groups on the mailers weren't really that different at all. >> the common denominator appeared to be a chap named christian lefer. christian lefer had signed some of the paper work. his name appeared on some of the paperwork. my name is christian lefer, and i'm the creator of getnonprofitstatus.com and the nonprofit launch kit. >> ryssdal: lefer had come to montana back in the mid-2000s to work on conservative causes. he turned out eventually to be the director of strategy for wtp. but when unsworth tried to learn more about lefer and wtp's activities, he had trouble getting answers. until, he got a big break. >> we came across what i'd call a friendly witness, someone who was directly involved, appeared to have been directly involved in the activity, who became t di
again? they had bill clinton to lead that. ron brown as the chairman of the party. >> rose: in '88? >> from '88 to '92. it's not clear who that would be for the republicans. people talk about jeb bush, i'm not sure he's ready to take that on. there's no other obvious candidate to me right now the big issue now before we get to the elections starting in earnest-- though i agree it starts to some extent on wednesday-- is the fight over the fiscal cliff which will really divide republicans in congress and people like mike huckabee and rick santorum and others who are thinking about running for president next time. people are going to have to choose up sides and if president obama is leading those negotiations it's going to be an obama deal so for a lot of republicans in congress and around the country they're against it no matter what. they don't care what percentage of the vote he got, how big his mandate is, they'll be against it because it will have revenue in it, new revenue, and they'll be against it. >> rose: because it is -- that vote is influenced by how they perceive the batt
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)